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Jul 1st, 2014 We Can Help You Recover From Your London Sensitivities Get in touch

2839654_blogIf you wince every time you bite into an apple, your morning latte brings both pleasure and pain or you try your best to resist the lure of refreshing ice lollies in the summer, you’re not alone. Tooth sensitivity is a very common problem, but with so many delicious ice-cold summer drinks and indulgent ice creams on offer, isn’t it time you saw your dentist to sort out those sensitive teeth?

What causes sensitivity?

Sensitivity is usually the result of worn or damaged enamel; it occurs because the dentin section of the tooth, which contains the blood vessels and nerves, becomes exposed when the enamel is thin or weak. Sensitivity can also be symptomatic of tooth decay or a dental abscess.

Many people suffer from mild sensitivity when they bite into an ice cream or sip on a piping hot drink, but if you have severe pain or you suffer from sensitivity on a regular basis, it’s advisable to see your dentist. There may be an underlying cause, which needs treating.

What can be done for sensitive teeth?

In the short-term, it’s a good idea to avoid triggers and to start using sensitive toothpaste. These toothpastes are specially designed to provide instant relief from pain associated with sensitivity and also to prevent pain in the future. It’s a good idea to use straws to drink cold drinks and to leave your hot drinks to cool slightly before sipping on them; we also recommend cutting up apples and other acidic foods, which may cause you discomfort.

You should book an appointment with your dentist so that they can check your teeth for signs of decay or any other problems, which may be making you susceptible to sensitivity. If you have a cavity, for example, we can fill the tooth and this should enable you to enjoy a pain-free summer.

Talk to Us

To talk to us about ending denture worries with fixed implants, call Aqua Dental on 020 8819 1548 or get in touch through our contact form.